…to decadent Boudoirs

A lovely fall evening to you, my colleagues!  As we continue on with our series of pattern previews – complete with an inside scoop from the designers – let’s make a stop at one of my favorite chapters: Boudoir, where knitting shows its decidedly sensual side.  Let’s start with a gorgeous little number that’s been all the buzz on Ravelry lately…

The Hush Chemise

Designer: Amanda Williams

Yarn: DyeForYarn Lace // Silk/Merino

In the latter half of the 19th century a woman would always wear a chemise under her corset. These were traditionally sewn from fabric, but I thought a knitted version would be lovely.  I wanted a bit of lace at the top and the bottom to make a feminine, playful top. I can’t think of anywhere I’d rather wear a delicate silk/merino yarn. These days we don’t seem to wear corsets quite so often, but in the tradition of innerwear as outerwear, this piece can really shine. I finished the one I did for myself last spring and wore it all summer long with jeans for casual days and a skirt to dress up a bit. I can’t wait to layer it this winter under jackets and cardigans.

A few notes on customizing it to your size. The lace repeat is 23 stitches wide. This means the pattern does not lend itself well to adding or removing stitches. Do be sure to swatch the lace portion to check how it will fit around your shoulders. Likewise check your stockinette gauge to match your bust measurement. This is designed to be close fitting at the bust but relaxed elsewhere. If you are finding yourself between sizes, I recommend changing needle sizes to get a gauge suitable for your sizing.

I ran a cord a through the top eyelets of my personal version to help it stay snug around my shoulders. You can do the same with ribbon or elastic to further enhance the fit. This will work up beautifully in a delicate lace weight yarn to be reminiscent of lingerie, or a fingering weight to be a casual t-shirt style.

Enjoy and please post your projects on Ravelry! I want to see what you do with it and how you wear it

The Trials and Tribulations Chemise and Bloomers

Designer: Aimee Skeers

Yarn: Evermore Studios Swanky Sock (or Prestige Sock)

I love bloomers.  Is that weird?  If so, I don’t actually care.  I love wearing them under full skirts so if an errant breeze rolls in, I don’t have to worry.  They’re adorable, so it’s only natural that I’d write a pattern for them.  I didn’t want to just write a bloomer pattern, though, since part of the fun of bloomers is wearing something over them.  The chemise is intended to be work either as part of the set, or as a top on its own.  Wear it just over a bra if you’re feeling saucy, or over a camisole to make it more work appropriate.  And remember, bloomers are awesome.

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From Soaring Airships to Mad Science Labs

Greetings, my colleagues!  As promised, today I am thrilled to bring to you the first detailed pattern reveals from our upcoming publication:

 The Ladies of Mischief Interrupt Their Knitting To Present To You,

Needles and Artifice:
A Refined Adventure Story with Ingenious Knitting Patterns

Coming to you later this summer from Cooperative Press, and all of us here at Mischief Central.  Here’s an in-depth look at two of the patterns, with another two to be revealed next Sunday.  Enjoy!

Airship Captain Coraline Hackworth, always the picture of efficiency and style

Legacy Frock Coat

Designer: Sarra Loew

Yarn: Fidalgo 100% Merino by Woolgatherings

The Legacy Frock Coat was designed out of the most inspiring blend of elements- practicality combined with style. The cozy long sleeves and long tail provide coverage while the open front frames, flatters, and prevents overheating. The tail (which is adjustable to each knitter’s preference) solved a tricky fashion problem for me; I find low-rise pants comfortable to wear, but sitting in them can cause unwanted exposure. The Legacy Frock Coat sweater neatly solves this problem by covering just the back of the hips. The open front of the sweater makes it comfortably wearable in a variety of temperatures.
The style, reminiscent of formal frock coats, lends a classy feel to the coat, making it appropriate as a formal coverup. It’s not fussy at all, and is also easily utilized for day to day wear. It looks smashing in bright saturated colors, and in self-striping yarns. I have multiple versions of this coat and plan to make many more. The pattern is easy to knit and customize to your exact measurements. I hope that many knitters enjoy making and wearing this fine coat!

Miss Hackworth didn’t earn the right to run the family business by being timid

Sleek, poised, and elegant

The Null Hypothesis Scarf

Designer: Katrina Elsaesser

Yarn: Yarn Pirate Superwash BFL

I’ve always loved charted knitting designs; if you were ever a kid who drew on graph paper, or played with making pixelated characters on the computer, I’m sure you can relate. Absolutely anything you can draw out in little rectangles can be turned into a knitted garment, which pleases me to no end. I’ve also always loved the metamorphosing works of M.C. Escher, where one artistic element slowly turns into another, and into another, sometimes even morphing back around to the beginning. One fateful night, when pondering what a mad scientist might knit, those two elements fell serendipitously together and produced this scarf… all six feet of it.
Yet another thing I love is the (in my option) underutilized technique of Double Knitting. With only a few extra tricks – included in the pattern – you can produce a gorgeous, flat, non-rolling, reversible, warm and amazingly smooshy fabric. Absolutely perfect for scarves, and intricate charted patterns – floats are a non-issue!
The pattern journeys through books and beakers, gears and pipes, swirls and filigree. Take one chart element and makes some gloves, or repeat your favorite parts into a scarf design all your own. I hope this pattern takes you to you a place that’s perhaps a little mad, but quite inspired.

Dr. Erma Melanogaster may have a few screws loose, but her style is unquestionable

When creativity and science come together, ingenious things happen

The Scent of a Lady, pt 3

Greetings once again my colleagues!  I just finished up a very exciting meeting about the Ladies of Mischief book project – lots of excellent progress!  I can’t wait for you all to see it. I have a feeling things are going to start moving very quickly from here on out!

But in the meantime, I have something special to share with you today.  Without any further ado, I’m pleased to present the final installment in the tale of Miss Alyssa Rynne’s perfume.  As you may recall in the previous installment, I mentioned a gorgeous bottle containing the last of Alyssa’s perfume.  Well, it wasn’t specifically the bottle that was so lovely, it was what the bottle was wearing, as it were.  Another dear knitting friend of mine, Valerie DiPietro, was able to decipher and re-create Alyssa’s beautiful lace bottle cozy, which I’m delighted to bring to you now.  Truly, what dignified Lady would use a bottle without one?  Enjoy!

A Most Useful Cozy

A lovely spring day to you, my colleagues.  As promised, I have treat for you today!  You may recall Miss O’ Hare mentioning a favorite tea cozy of hers, yes?  Well, while investigating the trunk a short while back, I found none other than that very cozy (or one in the same pattern) along with her knitting instructions!  As you might imagine they were a little worse for the wear after so many years, and the notes needed some modernization, so I handed them off to a dear knitter friend Aimee Skeers to touch up.  She did an outstanding job, and I’m thrilled to share this lovely Mischief Recreation Artifact with you!  It’s both adorable and quite ingenious, much like its creator.  Here are her original notes on the clever design:

From Miss Anna Roisin O’Hare to the Ladies of Mischief:

Dear friends, I know you will appreciate the difficulties of keeping one’s tea piping hot and one’s teapot protected when one lives a lifestyle such as ours. Fed up with other cozies, I set out to design one that would fulfill my needs. With this clever little thing I can pour my tea without removing the cozy, while the lacing allows me easy access to the top of the pot for brewing. It can be left on at all times, as well, in order to protect the pot when turbulence rattles the dirigible. On my last trip to the Arabias I found my inspiration for the pattern. I do so love to look at the cozy and remember my travels while I have a cup of tea.

View the pattern on Ravelry or 

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